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Climate justice is an issue of women, workers and urban poor

  The Center for Trade Union and Human Rights in partnership with the Asia Pacific Women Law and Development Forum (APWLD) launched early this year its climate justice feminist participatory action research program (CJ-FPAR) on urban poor women and women workers in select villages in Novaliches, Quezon City, Valenzuela City and Caloocan City.
Urban poor and women workers from Novaliches and Caloocan talk about climate change, climate justice and human rights

Urban poor and women workers from Novaliches and Caloocan talk about climate change, climate justice and human rights

A group of women leaders from three local organizations namely Samahan ng Manggagawa at Kristiyanong Pamayanan (SMKP) at Women Workers in Struggle for Employment, Empowerment and Emancipation (Women WISE3) and Labor Alliance for Wage Increase (LAWIN), were chosen as part of the research core group to facilitate the CJ-FPAR in the communities mentioned. The research aims to see the impact of climate disasters and climate adaptation policies (involving development projects) on 1) socio-economic conditions and 2) adaptation capacities/practices of urban poor women and women workers. From March to June, the local partner organizations were introduced to “climate justice” as a concept and rallying campaign demand especially for groups most vulnerable to climate disasters. The FPAR was used as framework and method in conducting the research aimed at empowering and providing space for women workers and urban poor women in the climate change discourse and climate justice campaign. A series of discussions on climate change and climate justice had been held to the research core group, their respective organizations and on community assemblies. On the second phase of research that started last June, training on research method, human rights were also done and this will be followed by the focus group discussions among women residents of target communities and women workers.###